Pathology of the Gastrointestinal Tract

2017 Edition
| Editors: Fátima Carneiro, Paula Chaves, Arzu Ensari

Bacterial Enterocolitis

  • Anne Jouret-Mourin
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-40560-5_1422

Synonyms

Dysentery

Definition

Bacterial colitis is an inflammatory-type diarrhea which can be caused by a variety of enteric pathogenic bacteria and affects both the small and large intestine or exclusively the large intestine (Table 1).
Bacterial Enterocolitis, Table 1

Histologic patterns of bacterial colitis

 

Mild or no histological changes

Acute self-limiting colitis

IBD-like

Ischemic pattern

Pseudomembranous pattern

CD

UC

Clostridium difficile

   

+ (early stage)

 

+ (later stage)

++

Salmonella typhimurium

 

+

++

+

   

Non-typhoid

 

++

 

+

   

(O1)V. cholerae

++

+

       

Shigella

 

++

+

+

 

+

Campylobacter

 

++

+

+

   

Aeromonas (sp.)

 

++

+

+

+

 

Yersinia

   

++ (YP)

     

E. coli

           

EPEC

++

         

EAEC

++

         

EHEC

+

+

   

++

+

++: most often

+: rarely

EPEC enteropathogenic E. coli

EAEC enteroadherent E. coli

EHEC enterohemorrhagic E. coli

YP Yersinia pseudotuberculosis

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References and Further Reading

  1. Aslam, S. (2006). An update on diagnosis, treatment and prevention of Clostridium difficile-associated disease. Gastroenterology Clinics of North America, 35, 315–335.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Gleason, T. H., et al. (1982). The pathology of Yersinia enterocolitica ileocolitis. American Journal of Surgical Pathology, 6, 347–355.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Gomez, L., et al. (1998). Necrotizing enterocolitis: Spectrum of the disease and comparison of definite and possible cases. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 27, 695–699.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Griffin, P. M., et al. (1990). Escherichia coli 0157:H7-associated colitis: A clinical and histological study of 11 cases. Gastroenterology, 99, 142–149.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Islam, M. M. (1994). Pathology of shigellosis and its complications. Histopathology, 24, 65–71.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Kelly, J., et al. (1987). The histopathology of rectosigmoid biopsies from adults with bloody diarrhea due to verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli. American Journal of Clinical Pathology, 88, 78–82.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Lamps, L. W. (2007). Infective disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Histopathology, 50, 55–63.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Naktin, J., et al. (1999). Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Clinics in Laboratory Medicine, 19, 523–536.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Otaibi, A., et al. (2002). Neutropenic enterocolitis after pediatric bone marrow transplant. Journal of Pediatric Surgery, 37, 770–772.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Price, A. B., et al. (1977). Pseudomembranous colitis. Journal of Clinical Pathology, 30, 1–12.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Speelman, P., et al. (1984). Distribution and spread of colonic lesions in shigellosis: A colonoscopic study. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 150, 899–903.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Surawicz, C. M. (1999). Pseudomembranous colitis. Causes and cures. Digestion, 60, 91–100.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Welinder-Olsson, C., et al. (2005). Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC). Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, 37, 405–416.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PathologyCliniques Universitaires St. Luc, UCLBrusselsBelgium