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Nonimmunologic Contact Urticaria

  • John Havens Cary
  • Howard I. Maibach
  • Ian Yamaguchi
  • A. Lahti
Living reference work entry

Abstract

Rapid onset of sign and symptoms

Minimal exposure may produce burn, sting, and itch only

At high exposure, almost all respond

Morphology – redness and urtication

Often confused with other forms of irritation

Keywords

Contact dermatitis NICU NICR Immediate-type irritancy Cinnamic Acid Sorbic Acid 

References

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Havens Cary
    • 1
  • Howard I. Maibach
    • 1
  • Ian Yamaguchi
    • 1
  • A. Lahti
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of DermatologyUniversity of California Medical SchoolSan FranciscoUSA

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