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War, State Formation, and Nationalism

  • Siniša MaleševićEmail author
Living reference work entry

Abstract

This chapter explores how wars shape state formation and what role nationalism plays in this process. In the first part of the chapter, the author offers a critical analysis of the classical and contemporary bellicits theories of state formation. Although bellicits offer persuasive arguments about the relationship between wars, geopolitics, and state formation, they largely neglect to analyze the internal dynamics that mold the nationalist ideas and practices. To counter this analytical omission, the second part of the chapter develops an alternative explanatory framework centered on the historical dynamics of grounded nationalisms and their relationship with war and state formation. The rest of the chapter applies this analytical framework to the case study of the nineteenth and twentieth century Balkans.

Keywords

Nationalism War Violence State formation Balkans Bellicit theories 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of SociologyUniversity College DublinDublinIreland

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