Encyclopedia of Personality and Individual Differences

Living Edition
| Editors: Virgil Zeigler-Hill, Todd K. Shackelford

Implicit Attitudes

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-28099-8_681-1
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Introduction

Implicit attitudes can be defined as associations between social objects and positive or negative attributes that are accessible by the use of implicit measurement procedures without requiring introspective self-report (Greenwald et al. 2002). During the last three decades, social cognition research has made enormous progress with developing both reliable and valid measures of implicit attitudes (cf. Bar-Anan and Nosek 2014). The family of implicit attitude measures is composed of a variety of measurement instruments as diverse as the Implicit Association Test (IAT), Evaluative Priming Tasks, Affect Misattribution Procedure, and Approach-Avoidance Tasks. Many but not all of these procedures use response time latencies in order to assess the strength of evaluative associations. A core characteristic of the IAT and many other implicit measures is that they assess relative association strengths by contrasting speed of responses between two different combinations of two...

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References

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.International Psychoanalytic UniversityBerlinGermany

Section editors and affiliations

  • John F. Rauthmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyWake Forest UniversityWinston-SalemUSA