Encyclopedia of Personality and Individual Differences

Living Edition
| Editors: Virgil Zeigler-Hill, Todd K. Shackelford

Gilliland, Kirby

  • Kirby GillilandEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-28099-8_1725-1

Kirby Gilliland is a Professor Emeritus in the Department of Psychology at the University of Oklahoma. He was trained in experimental personality and clinical psychology and has broad interests in personality and individual differences characteristics, especially as they relate to human performance and cognition. He also has extensive experience in developing and evaluating computer-based test batteries applied to human performance and neurocognitive assessment. While focusing primarily on theoretically based research in personality and individual differences, Gilliland has also demonstrated how researchers in these subdisciplines can make contributions to a broad range of areas such as psychophysics, human performance, assessment, psychophysiology, neuropsychology, and clinical psychology.

Early Life and Educational Background

Born in 1947, Gilliland’s early life was divided between a small southwestern farming town and the San Francisco Bay Area, providing a combination of unique...

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Selected Bibliography

  1. Bullock, W. B., & Gilliland, K. (1993). A convergent measures investigation of Eysenck’s theory of introversion-extraversion. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 64, 113–123.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bullock, W., Gilliland, K., & Kujawski, A. (1982). Effects of stimulus intensity and repetition rate on brainstem auditory evoked response and recovery rate of introverts and extraverts. Psychophysiology, 19, 552–553.Google Scholar
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  12. Gilliland, K., & Schlegel, R. E. (1995, January). Readiness-to-perform testing and the worker. Ergonomics in Design, 14–19.Google Scholar
  13. Gilliland, K., & Tutko, T. A. (1978). Differences in parent-child relations between athletes and non-athletes. Journal of Sport Behavior, 1, 51–60.Google Scholar
  14. Gilliland, K., Shingledecker, C., Wilson, G., & Peio, K. (1984). Effect of workload on the auditory evoked brainstem response. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, 28(1), 37–39.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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  17. Gilliland, K., Schlegel, R., Dannels, S., & Mills, S. (1989). Relationship between intelligence and criterion task set performance. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, 33(2), 888–890.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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  19. Humphreys, M. S., Revelle, W. R., Simon, L., & Gilliland, K. (1980). Individual differences in diurnal rhythms and multiple activation states: A reply to M. W. Eysenck and Folkard. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 109, 42–48.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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  26. Revelle, W. R., Humphreys, M. S., Simon, L., & Gilliland, K. (1980). The interactive effect of personality, time of day, and caffeine: A test of the arousal model. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 109, 1–31.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Roebuck-Spencer, T., Vincent, A. S., Twillie, D. A., Logan, B. W., Lopez, M., Friedl, K. E., Grate, S. J., Schlegel, R. E., & Gilliland, K. (2012). Cognitive change associated with self-reported mild traumatic brain injury sustained during the OEF/OIF conflicts. The Clinical Neuropsychologist, 26(3), 473–489.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Roebuck-Spencer, T., Vincent, A. S., Schlegel, R. E., & Gilliland, K. (2013a). Evidence for added value of baseline testing in computer-based cognitive assessment. Journal of Athletic Training, 48(4), 449–505.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Roebuck-Spencer, T. M., Vincent, A. S., Gilliland, K., Johnson, D. R., & Cooper, D. B. (2013b). Initial clinical validation of an embedded performance validity measure within the automated neuropsychological assessment metrics (ANAM). Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 28, 700–710.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Schlegel, R. E., & Gilliland, K. (2003). Dynamic-load performance tests. In G. R. J. Hockey, A. W. K. Gaillard, & A. Y. Burov (Eds.), Operator functional state and impaired performance in complex work (NATO ASI Series, Series A, Life Sciences). New York: Plenum.Google Scholar
  31. Schlegel, R. E., & Gilliland, K. (2007). Development and quality assurance of computerized assessment batteries. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 22(S1), 49–61.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Swickert, R. J., & Gilliland, K. (1998). Relationship between the brainstem auditory evoked response and extraversion, impulsivity, and sociability. Journal of Research in Personality, 32, 314–330.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Swickert, R., Cox-Fuenzalida, E., & Gilliland, K. (2006). Investigating the relationship between extraversion and the auditory brainstem response: A cross-validation approach. Individual Differences Research, 4, 292–298.Google Scholar
  34. Vincent, A. S., Roebuck-Spencer, T., Gilliland, K., & Schlegel, R. E. (2012a). Automated neuropsychological assessment metrics (v4) traumatic brain injury battery: Military normative data. Military Medicine, 177(3), 256–269.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Vincent, A. S., Roebuck-Spencer, T., Lopez, M. S., Twillie, D. A., Logan, B. W., Grate, S. J., Friedl, K. E., Schlegel, R. E., & Gilliland, K. (2012b). Effects of military deployment on cognitive functioning. Military Medicine, 177(3), 248–255.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of OklahomaNormanUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • April Phillips
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychology and CounselingNortheastern State UniversityBroken ArrowUSA