Encyclopedia of Personality and Individual Differences

Living Edition
| Editors: Virgil Zeigler-Hill, Todd K. Shackelford

Assortative Mating Model

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-28099-8_1602-1

Synonyms

Definition

Assortative mating is the idea that romantic partners often have correlated scores (either positive or negative) on a wide range of personality, demographic, and other characteristics.

Introduction

Assortative mating is the idea that romantic partners often have correlated scores (either positive or negative) on a wide range of personality, demographic, and other characteristics. Positive assortative mating is when individuals are similar to each other, while negative assortative mating – also referred to as disassortative mating – is when individuals share complementary traits, such as one person being dominant while the other person is submissive (Figueredo et al. 2005). A large body of research suggests that both humans and nonhuman animals show assortative mating on a wide variety of traits (Olderbak and Figueredo 2012; Jiang et al. 2013).

Assortative Mating and Personality Traits

Research...

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References

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  3. Figueredo, A. J., Sefcek, J. A., Vasquez, G., Brumbach, B. H., King, J. E., & Jacobs, W. J. (2005). Evolutionary personality psychology. In D.M. Buss’ (Ed.), The handbook of evolutionary psychology, (pp. 851–877). Hoboken: Wiley.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Psychological ScienceEastern Connecticut State UniversityWillimanticUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Glenn Scheyd
    • 1
  1. 1.Nova Southeastern UniversityFort LauderdaleUSA