Encyclopedia of Latin American Religions

2019 Edition
| Editors: Henri Gooren

Chinese New Religions

  • Matheus Oliva da CostaEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-27078-4_208

Definition

Chinese new religions can be seen as any institutionalized religious tradition that has created a new form and/or a new sense of context based on traditional religions found in China. By traditional religions of China, we refer mainly to Buddhism, Confucianism, and Daoism as well as the Chinese synthesis of them, the 三 教 Sanjiao or Three Teachings. Here we have in mind religions born since the nineteenth century in Chinese culture from this great repertoire mentioned above, and especially those who arrived in Latin America (LA).

Introduction

According to the scheme presented by Irons (2006b), there are two possibilities for the origin of new religions in China: (1) by force of external cultural influences (Buddhism, Christianity, ethnic religions, etc.) or (2) by borrowing and synthesis of existing cultural systems, usually with creative leaders. Thus, the creation of new religions in China has the hallmark of the processes of adaptation of new elements and synthesis of...

Keywords

Three Teachings Redemptive societies Tiandao Falun Gong Master Qinghai 
This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References

  1. Fat PBTS (2009) Chinese new migrants in Suriname: the inevitability of ethnic performing. Amsterdam University Press, AmsterdamGoogle Scholar
  2. Irons E (2006a) Yiguandao (Tian Dao). In: Partridge C (ed) Enciclopédia das Novas Religiões: novos movimentos religiosos, seitas e espiritualidades alternativas. Editorial Verbo, Lisboa, p 238, 245–246Google Scholar
  3. Irons E (2006b) Novas religiões Chinesas. In: Partridge C (ed) Enciclopédia das Novas Religiões: novos movimentos religiosos, seitas e espiritualidades alternativas. Editorial Verbo, Lisboa, pp 239–244Google Scholar
  4. Lu Y (2005) Chinese traditional sects in modern society: a case study of Yiguan Dao. Thesis of doctorate in Applied Social Studies, City University of Hong KongGoogle Scholar
  5. Lu Y, Johnson B, Stark R (2008) Deregulation and the religious market in Taiwan: a research note. Sociol Q 49:139–153CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Ownby D (2003) The Falun Gong in the new world. Eur J East Asian Stud 2(2):303–320CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Ownby D (2008) Falun Gong and the future of China. Oxford University Press, OxfordCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Palmer D, Katz P, Wang C (2011) Introduction: redemptive societies in cultural and historical context. J Chin Theatre Ritual and Folk/Minsu Quyi 173:1–12Google Scholar
  9. Poceski M (2009) Introducing Chinese religions. Routledge, London/New YorkGoogle Scholar
  10. Porter N (2003) Falun Gong in the United States: an ethnographic study. Thesis for MA in Anthropology, University of South FloridaGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciência da ReligiãoPontifical University of São PauloSão PauloBrazil