Encyclopedia of Personality and Individual Differences

2020 Edition
| Editors: Virgil Zeigler-Hill, Todd K. Shackelford

Bobo Doll Experiment

  • Jennifer E. LansfordEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-24612-3_1214

Definition

The original Bobo doll experiment was conducted by Bandura et al. (1961) using a 5-ft inflatable clown (the Bobo doll) to demonstrate that children can learn aggressive behavior in the absence of any rewards and solely by observing the behavior of an adult model.

Introduction

At the time the original Bobo doll experiment was conducted, learning was understood through behaviorism as conceptualized by Skinner (1953). Individuals were believed to learn through rewards and punishments. Rewards such as money, praise, or other desirable tangible and intangible reinforcements were believed to increase the likelihood that someone would behave in a particular way, whereas punishments were believed to decrease the likelihood that someone would behave in a particular way. For example, a boy who pushed a classmate off a swing and was rewarded by being allowed to swing right away would be more likely in the future to push a classmate off the swing when he wanted a turn. However, if the...

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References

  1. Bandura, A. (1977). Social learning theory. New York: General Learning Press.Google Scholar
  2. Bandura, A., Ross, D., & Ross, S. A. (1961). Transmission of aggression through imitation of aggressive models. Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 63, 575–582.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  3. Bandura, A., Ross, D., & Ross, S. A. (1963). Imitation of film-mediated aggressive models. Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 66, 3–11.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  4. Miller, N. E., & Dollard, J. (1941). Social learning and imitation. New Haven: Yale University Press.Google Scholar
  5. Skinner, B. F. (1953). Science and human behavior. New York: Macmillan.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Center for Child and Family PolicyDuke UniversityDurhamUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Ashton Southard
    • 1
  1. 1.Oakland UniversityRochesterUSA