Encyclopedia of Evolutionary Psychological Science

Living Edition
| Editors: Todd K. Shackelford, Viviana A. Weekes-Shackelford

Benefits of Profound Kinship Connectedness (and Problems from a Lack Thereof) Through an Evolutionary Mismatch Lens

  • Jiaqing OEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-16999-6_1260-1

Synonyms

Definition

Being physically and emotionally close to one’s kin was instrumental for ensuring well-being and survival in the brutal ancestral context. Although the contemporary world is generally a much more secure and socially progressive place to live in, the lack of adequate support from one’s kin (which are relatively more evident in the present day as people become more independent from their kin due to greater perceived safety and opportunities) might nonetheless still lead to adverse consequences for the affected individual (as relatives are still principally more likely to aid him/her across a variety of life domains than non-kin).

Introduction

Throughout the course of evolutionary history, Homo sapienshave generally lived in small closely knitted groups comprising...

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyAberystwyth UniversityAberystwythUK

Section editors and affiliations

  • Todd K. Shackelford
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyOakland UniversityRochesterUSA