Encyclopedia of Couple and Family Therapy

Living Edition
| Editors: Jay Lebow, Anthony Chambers, Douglas C. Breunlin

Freedman, Jill

  • Irma RodrÃguezEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-15877-8_889-1

Name

Jill Holly Freedman (1951–).

Introduction

Jill Freedman works as a narrative therapist, supervisor, consultant, and trainer, both at her center in Chicago and internationally. She has practiced, studied, taught, and written about narrative therapy for over three decades.

Career

Jill Freedman received her M.S.W. from George Warren Brown School of Social Work at Washington University in St. Louis in 1975. She then studied family therapy and, beginning in 1986, studied intensively with Michael White and David Epston. From 1975 through 1982 she worked in schools for children excluded from public schools, then went into independent practice. She is Co-Director of the Evanston Family Therapy Center, an independent postgraduate training center dedicated to teaching narrative therapy. She is a founding member of the Chicago Center for Family Health, an independent affiliate of the University of Chicago, and is on the international faculty of the Dulwich Center in Adelaide, Australia....

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Key Citations

  1. Combs, G., & Freedman, J. (2016). Narrative therapy’s relational understanding of identity. Family Process, 55(2), 211–224.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Freedman, J. (2012). Explorations of the absent but implicit. The International Journal of Narrative Therapy and Community Work, 4, 1.Google Scholar
  3. Freedman, J., & Combs, G. (1996). Narrative therapy: The social construction of preferred realities. New York: Norton. (Also in Russian, Taiwanese, Korean, Chinese, Czech, and Serbian translations).Google Scholar
  4. Freedman, J., & Combs, G. (2002). Narrative therapy with couples … and a whole lot more! Adelaide: Dulwich Centre. (Also in Korean translation).Google Scholar
  5. Freedman, J., & Combs, G. (2009). Narrative ideas for consulting with communities and organizations: Ripples from the gatherings. Family Process, 48(3), 347–362.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Books

  1. Combs, G., & Freedman, J. (1990). Symbol, story, and ceremony: Using metaphor in individual and family therapy. New York: Norton.Google Scholar
  2. Denborough, D., Freedman, J., & White, C. (2008). Strengthening resistance: The use of narrative practices in working with genocide survivors. Adelaide: Dulwich Centre Publications. (Booklet).Google Scholar
  3. Freedman, J., & Combs, G. (1996). Narrative therapy: The social construction of preferred realities. New York: Norton. (Also in Russian, Taiwanese, Korean, Chinese, Czech, and Serbian Translations).Google Scholar
  4. Freedman, J., & Combs, G. (2002). Narrative therapy with couples … and a whole lot more! Adelaide: Dulwich Centre Publications. (Also in Korean Translation).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Grupo Campos ElÃseosMexico CityMexico

Section editors and affiliations

  • Margarita Tarragona
    • 1
  1. 1.PositivaMente & Grupo Campos ElíseosMexico CityMexico