Encyclopedia of Couple and Family Therapy

Living Edition
| Editors: Jay Lebow, Anthony Chambers, Douglas C. Breunlin

Low Sexual Desire in Couple and Family Therapy

  • Kristin M. BennionEmail author
  • Natasha Helfer-Parker
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-15877-8_435-1

Name of Concept

Low Sexual Desire in Couple and Family Therapy

Synonyms

Introduction

Inhibited sexual desire or conflicts over desire discrepancies are some of the most common complaints that sex therapists report seeing come through their offices. Defining “low” or “high” sexual desire can be inherently problematic, as most couples are already using each other’s desire level as a yardstick for comparison and many therapists become complicit in accepting the couple’s definitions as sufficient assessment to move ahead with treatment. Often, the lower desire partner is partner-labeled or assumes the responsibility of having something “wrong” with them (e.g., frigid, broken, puritanical, sexually inhibited, boring, non-adventurous). The higher desire partner can also be subject to negative labels (e.g., hypersexual, perverse, horny, “only wants sex,” selfish). With so many couples wanting to better...

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.California Institute of Integral StudiesSan FranciscoUSA
  2. 2.Intimate Connections CounselingOremUSA
  3. 3.Symmetry SolutionsWichitaUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Farrah Hughes
    • 1
  • Allen Sabey
    • 2
  1. 1.Employee Assistance ProgramMcLeod HealthFlorenceUSA
  2. 2.The Family Institute at Northwestern UniversityEvanstonUSA