Encyclopedia of Psychology and Religion

2020 Edition
| Editors: David A. Leeming

Buddhist Chaplaincy

  • Jane CompsonEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-24348-7_9375
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Introduction

Buddhist Chaplaincy is a relatively recent phenomenon, having first appeared in the USA and the UK in the 1980s. However, it is quickly growing in popularity and has increasing representation especially in the fields of the military, healthcare, and criminal justice. Particularly in the USA, training programs in Buddhist chaplaincy have begun to proliferate in response to demand. Buddhist chaplaincy is rooted in the fundamental compassionate motivation to alleviate suffering. This entry will briefly describe the origin of chaplaincy in Christianity and its emergence in Buddhist contexts. It will describe accreditation and training and the roles of contemporary Buddhist chaplains. Despite the recent increase of Buddhist chaplains and training programs, little has been written analytically about chaplaincy and the study of this field is in its nascent phases.

History

The concept and role of a chaplain is rooted in the Christian tradition. The word “chaplain” comes from...

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Bibliography

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Web Resources

  1. Angulimala, Buddhist Prison Chaplaincy UK. http://angulimala.org.uk/
  2. Buddhist Chaplaincy and Related Organizations.Google Scholar
  3. Chaplaincy training programs in the US.Google Scholar
  4. Institute of Buddhist Studies Certificate in Buddhist Chaplaincy. http://www.shin-ibs.edu/academics/certificate-programs/buddhist-chaplaincy/
  5. New York Zen Center for Contemplative Care Professional Chaplaincy Training. http://zencare.org/contemplative-care-training-program/professional-cpe-buddhist-chaplaincy-training
  6. Prison Mindfulness Institute, US. http://www.prisonmindfulness.org/
  7. Sati Center Buddhist Chaplaincy Training Program. http://www.sati.org/buddhist-chaplaincy-training-program/
  8. The Buddhist Society Buddhist Chaplaincy Support Group UK. http://www.thebuddhistsociety.org/resources/bcsg-chaplaincy/
  9. University of the West, Master of Divinity in Buddhist Chaplaincy. http://www.uwest.edu/site/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=125&Itemid=165

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Washington TacomaTacomaUSA