Encyclopedia of Psychology and Religion

2020 Edition
| Editors: David A. Leeming

Neumann, Eric

  • Vivianne CrowleyEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-24348-7_9008

Early Life

Erich Neumann was a pioneering Jungian analyst and one of Jungian psychology’s most brilliant exponents. He was born in Berlin in 1905, the youngest of three children. His parents were nonpracticing Jews assimilated into German society. His lifelong friend Jungian analyst Gerhard Adler (1904–1988) described the young Neumann as having a “creative personality” that was “clear and impressive.” Intense and passionate, Neumann brought original and creative thinking to his friends’ discussions of the burning issues of the time – philosophy, psychology, poetry, art, and Jewish identity (Liebscher 2015, pp. xi–xii).

Neumann studied first in Berlin, then pursued doctoral studies in philosophy and psychology at the University of Elangen-Nuremburg, gaining a PhD in 1927. In 1928, he married Julie Blumenfeld and in 1932 the couple had a son, Micha. Neumann’s feeling that in Europe he would always be a “Galuth Jew,” a Jew in exile, was exacerbated by the rise of Nazism (Owens 2016). In...

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Cherry Hill SeminaryColumbiaUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyNottingham Trent UniversityNottinghamUK