Encyclopedia of Mathematics Education

2020 Edition
| Editors: Stephen Lerman

Discrete Mathematics Teaching and Learning

  • Cécile Ouvrier-BuffetEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-15789-0_51

Definition

The teaching of “discrete mathematics” is not always clearly delimited in the curricula and can be diffuse. In fact, the meaning of “discrete mathematics teaching and learning” is twofold. Indeed, it includes the teaching and learning of discrete concepts (considered as defined objects inscribed in a mathematical theory), but it also includes skills regarding reasoning, modeling, and proving (such skills are specific to discrete mathematics or transversal to mathematics).

What Is Discrete Mathematics?

Discrete mathematics is a comparatively young branch of mathematics with no agreed-on definition (Maurer 1997): only in the last 30 years did it develop as a specific field in mathematics with new ways of reasoning and generating concepts. Nevertheless, the roots of discrete mathematics are older: some emblematic historical discrete problems are now well known, also in education where they are often introduced as enigma, such as the four color theorem (map coloring problem),...

Keywords

Discrete mathematics Discrete Continuous Reasoning Proof Mathematical experience Problem-solving 
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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.UPEC and Laboratoire de Didactique André RevuzParisFrance

Section editors and affiliations

  • Ruhama Even
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Science TeachingThe Weizmann Institute of ScienceRehovotIsrael