Encyclopedia of Mathematics Education

2020 Edition
| Editors: Stephen Lerman

Mathematization as Social Process

  • Ole SkovsmoseEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-15789-0_112
  • 3 Downloads

Definition

Mathematization refers to the formatting of production, decision-making, economic management, means of communication, schemes for surveilling and control, war power, medical techniques, etc., by means of mathematical insight and techniques.

Mathematization provides a particular challenge for mathematics education as it becomes important to develop a critical position to mathematical rationality as well as new approaches to the construction of meaning.

Characteristics

The notions of mathematization and demathematization, the claim that there is mathematics everywhere, and mathematics in action are addressed, before we get to the challenges that mathematics education is going to face.

Mathematization and Demathematization

It is easy to do shopping in a supermarket. One puts a lot of things into the trolley and pushes it to the checkout desk. Here an electronic device used by the cashier makes a pling-pling-pling melody, and the total to be paid is shown. One gets out the...

Keywords

Mathematization Demathematization Mathematics in action Technological imagination Hypothetical reasoning Justification Legitimation Realization Elimination of responsibility Critical mathematics education 
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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Learning and PhilosophyAalborg UniversityAalborgDenmark

Section editors and affiliations

  • Eva Jablonka
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Education and PsychologyFreie Universität BerlinBerlinGermany