Peace Operations, Principles, and Doctrine

  • Emily Paddon RhoadsEmail author
  • Marion Laurence
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-11795-5_20-1

Definition

Peace operations are a central conflict management tool of the post-World War II international order. They are generally defined by their multilateral character and association with the “holy trinity” of peacekeeping principles: impartiality, consent, and the non-use of force except in self-defense. These core elements of peacekeeping doctrine were conceived during the Cold War when lightly armed missions were the norm and when peacekeepers were usually tasked with observing cease-fires and monitoring the implementation of interstate peace agreements. Since the end of the Cold War, peacekeeping more commonly occurs within conflict-affected states and alongside activities like peacebuilding, peacemaking, and peace enforcement. Many scholars and practitioners use the term “peace operations” to describe the complex, multidimensional missions where these activities overlap. The expansive goals of multidimensional peace operations have given rise to tensions around doctrine and...

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Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Political ScienceSwarthmore CollegeSwarthmoreUSA
  2. 2.Centre for International Policy StudiesUniversity of OttawaOttawaCanada
  3. 3.Department of Political ScienceUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada

Section editors and affiliations

  • Kai Michael Kenkel
  • Oliver Richmond
    • 1
  • Gëzim Visoka
    • 2
  1. 1.The University of ManchesterManchesterUK
  2. 2.Dublin City UniversityDublinIreland