Encyclopedia of Education and Information Technologies

2020 Edition
| Editors: Arthur Tatnall

Support for School and Institutional Improvement and Accountability

  • Dorothy DeWittEmail author
  • Norlidah Alias
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-10576-1_119
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Synonyms

Definition

Support for school and institutional improvement refers to the suggestions and guidelines for institutional leaders to be instructional leaders who are accountable for improving instructional practice and developing human capacity. An instructional leader inspires the institution in achieving a shared vision, develops policies related to the vision, builds a culture of data for decision-making, develops instructors’ capacities in technology and pedagogy, and provides the technology infrastructure and strategies for community involvement.

Introduction

Administrators, either as heads of schools or managers and governors of higher education institutes, have a prominent leadership role. They influence the condition of their staff’s work life, which can in turn influence staff effectiveness and students’ achievement outcomes (OECD 2009...

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Curriculum and Instructional Technology, Faculty of EducationUniversity of MalayaKuala LumpurMalaysia

Section editors and affiliations

  • Javier Osorio
    • 1
  1. 1.Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran CanariaCanariaSpain