Computer Vision

Living Edition

Omnidirectional Stereo

  • Christian RichardtEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-03243-2_808-1
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Synonyms

Related Concepts

Definition

Omnidirectional stereo (ODS) is a type of multi-perspective projection that captures horizontal parallax tangential to a viewing circle. This data allows the creation of stereo panoramas that provide plausible stereo views in all viewing directions on the equatorial plane.

Background

The term “omnidirectional stereo” was first coined by Ishiguru et al. [ 1] in 1990, who used it in the context of autonomous mapping and exploration of an unknown environment. Their approach places a video camera on a rotating arm that is driven by a stepper motor (see Fig. 1). They then take vertical slit images from the sensor image for creating the left/right stereo panoramic views. As their primary goal is to map an environment, they use ODS images for depth estimation of scene points rather than display. They also present a binocular stereo method for...
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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of BathBathUK

Section editors and affiliations

  • Sudipta Sinha

There are no affiliations available