Mew, Charlotte

  • Antonio Jimenez-MunozEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-02721-6_241-1
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Definition

Known for most of her troubled life as a fiction writer, Charlotte Mew’s significance as a poet is still in need of reappraisal. Despite receiving commendation in literary circles and being singled out as a truly unique poetic voice in her times, Mew’s work has largely been absent from discussions on Victorian or Modernist poetry, and often appropriated to serve ideological agendas. Her work – like that of other female Victorian poets – has all too readily been conflated with her tragic life. She only published 70 poems, 20 short stories, and a number of essays – although she is believed to have destroyed many of her texts before committing suicide. Her poetry in particular acts as a bridge between Victorian and Modernist sensibilities and freer, more complex poetic forms. Most importantly, her innovative use of poetic voice, disjointed syntax, and symbolism in her dramatic monologues makes her a notable proto-modernist and arguably one of the leading female poetic figures...

Keywords

Dramatic monologue Ghost stories Gothic Insanity Obscurity Periodicals Poverty The short story Suicide Victorian poetry The Yellow Book 
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References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.EnglishUniversity of OviedoOviedoSpain

Section editors and affiliations

  • Emily Morris
    • 1
  1. 1.St. Thomas More CollegeUniversity of SaskatchewanSaskatoonCanada