Encyclopedia of Sustainable Management

Living Edition
| Editors: Samuel Idowu, René Schmidpeter, Nicholas Capaldi, Liangrong Zu, Mara Del Baldo, Rute Abreu

Accountability

  • Louise Gorman
  • Anne Marie WardEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-02006-4_58-1
  • 16 Downloads

Synonyms

Description

In its broadest sense, accountability in the corporate context refers to the extent to which corporate agents, primarily managers and directors, take responsibility for actions taken within the corporate. Responsibility for the consequences of corporate actions extends to stakeholders including shareholders, loan creditors, trade contacts, employees, and society. Accountability is an area of corporate governance which has enduringly drawn the attention of policymakers and scholars. Often viewed from a financial perspective, accountability has been promoted in UK best governance practice guidelines since the publication of the Cadbury Report in 1992. Over time, the need for accountability to parties beyond those with financial interests in the corporate has been recognized, and the standards of accountability expected in the corporate environment have extended and increased. This entry reviews the evolution of the concept of...

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Technological University DublinDublinIreland
  2. 2.Ulster Business SchoolUlster UniversityNewtownabbeyNorthern Ireland

Section editors and affiliations

  • Carmela Gulluscio
    • 1
  1. 1.Unitelma Sapienza UniversityRomeItaly