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System Dynamics Applications to Health and Social Care in the United Kingdom and Europe

  • Eric WolstenholmeEmail author
Reference work entry
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Part of the Encyclopedia of Complexity and Systems Science Series book series (ECSSS)

Glossary

Terms Related to System Dynamics

(A combination of adaptations from the System Dynamics Society website, system dynamics software, and personal views)
A System

A collection of elements working together as parts of a complex whole whose behavior is greater than the sum of the parts. The word systems is often used to refer to complex phenomena existing in the world (such as financial systems, health systems, and computer systems), but the true meaning of systems refers more to an abstract or model of such phenomena existing only in a conceptual world we construct to think about systems.

Agent-based modeling

A style of computer simulation based on the actions and interactions of autonomous agents. This type of modeling can be thought of as a combination of continuous and discrete simulation methods.

Causal loop maps

A means of exposing and articulating the causal feedback processes at work in a complex system.

Complexity

Having a large number of interconnected elements which...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Symmetric ScenariosEdinburghUK

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