Encyclopedia of Database Systems

2018 Edition
| Editors: Ling Liu, M. Tamer Özsu

Private Information Retrieval

Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-8265-9_80752

Definition

Private information retrieval (PIR) protocol allows a user to retrieve the i-th bit of an n-bit database, without revealing to the database server the value of i. A trivial solution is for the user to retrieve the entire database, but this approach may incur enormous communication cost. A good PIR protocol is expected to have considerably lower communication complexity. Private block retrieval (PBR) is a natural and more practical extension of PIR in which, instead of retrieving only a single bit, the user retrieves a block of bits from the database.

Historical Background

PIR was first introduced by Chor, Goldreich, Kushilevitz, and Sudan [4] in 1995 in a multi-server setting, where the user retrieves information from multiple database servers, each of which has a copy of the same database. To ensure user privacy in the multi-server setting, the servers must be trusted not to collude. In [4], Chor et al. have shown that if only a single database is used, nbits must be...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Computer Science and Info TechRMIT UniversityMelbourneAustralia