Encyclopedia of Database Systems

2018 Edition
| Editors: Ling Liu, M. Tamer Özsu

Database Tuning Using Combinatorial Search

  • Surajit Chaudhuri
  • Vivek Narasayya
  • Gerhard Weikum
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-8265-9_33

Definition

Some database tuning problems can be formulated as combinatorial search, i.e., the problem of searching over a large space of discrete system configurations to find an appropriate configuration. One tuning problem where feasibility of combinatorial search has been demonstrated is physical database design. As part of the self-management capabilities of a database system, it is desirable to develop techniques for automatically recommending an appropriate physical design configuration to optimize database system performance. This entry describes the application of combinatorial search techniques to the problem of physical database design.

Historical Background

Combinatorial search (also referred to as combinatorial optimization) [8] is branch of optimization where the set of feasible solutions (or configurations) to the problem is discrete, and the goal is to find the “best” possible solution. Several well-known problems in computer science such as the Traveling Salesman...

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Recommended Reading

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Surajit Chaudhuri
    • 1
  • Vivek Narasayya
    • 2
  • Gerhard Weikum
    • 3
  1. 1.Microsoft ResearchMicrosoft CorporationRedmondUSA
  2. 2.Microsoft CorporationRedmondUSA
  3. 3.Department 5: Databases and Information SystemsMax-Planck-Institut für InformatikSaarbrückenGermany

Section editors and affiliations

  • Surajit Chaudhuri
    • 1
  1. 1.Microsoft ResearchMicrosoft CorporationRedmondUSA