Encyclopedia of Autism Spectrum Disorders

Living Edition
| Editors: Fred R. Volkmar

Bilingualism and Language Development in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

  • Ana Maria Gonzalez-BarreroEmail author
  • Aparna Nadig
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-6435-8_102508-1

Definition

Bilingually exposed children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are those who are exposed to two languages from early ages. These children are typically being raised in bilingual families and/or bilingual communities. Bilingualism is a multidimensional characteristic that is influenced by multiple factors such as sociolinguistic context (e.g., majority or minority language), age of acquisition, and amount of exposure or usage (for children) or proficiency (for older children and adults), among others (Surrain and Luk 2017). Additionally, socioeconomic differences are linked to bilingual status in some contexts. These factors need to be kept in mind when interpreting and comparing research findings (Kay-Raining Bird et al. 2016).

Historical Background

Parents of children with ASD are commonly advised to use only one language when interacting with their children. This often stems from beliefs that bilingualism might be too challenging or confusing for the child and hinder...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyConcordia UniversityMontrealCanada
  2. 2.School of Communication Sciences and DisordersMcGill UniversityMontrealCanada