Encyclopedia of Autism Spectrum Disorders

Living Edition
| Editors: Fred R. Volkmar

Screening Instruments for ASD

  • Roald A. ØienEmail author
  • Anders Nordahl-Hansen
  • Synnve Schjølberg
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-6435-8_102295-1

Definition

This entry focuses on screening instruments for autism spectrum disorders (ASD). By screening instruments, we are referring to two different purposes of instruments: Level 1 (Universal Screening or General Population Screening) and Level 2 (often tailored to other instruments for ASD screening in high risk cohorts, such as clinical samples). Level 1 screening instruments are often designed as parental questionnaires, while Level 2 screening instruments are typically designed to probe for ASD specific symptoms utilizing parent-endorsement and/or observations by a clinician. In terms of Level 1 screening instruments, the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (M-CHAT)(R/F) (Ibanez et al. 2014; Robins et al. 2001, 2014) is the most widely used instrument for ASD-specific screening. The M-CHAT is designed to be completed in a primary care provider setting (Robins et al. 2001). Among Level 2 screening instruments, the most frequently used examinations/assessments are the...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roald A. Øien
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Anders Nordahl-Hansen
    • 3
  • Synnve Schjølberg
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of EducationUiT – The Arctic University of NorwayTromsøNorway
  2. 2.Child Study CenterYale UniversityNew HavenUSA
  3. 3.Faculty of EducationØstfold University CollegeHaldenNorway
  4. 4.Mental and Physical HealthNorwegian Institute of Public HealthOsloNorway