Encyclopedia of Autism Spectrum Disorders

Living Edition
| Editors: Fred R. Volkmar

Smith, Tristram

  • Suzannah Iadarola
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4614-6435-8_102294-1

Name and Degrees

Tristram Smith, Ph.D.

Major Appointments (Institution, Location, Dates)

  • Haggerty-Friedman Professor of Developmental/Behavioral Pediatric Research, University of Rochester Medical Center (2016–2018)

  • Professor of Pediatrics, University of Rochester Medical Center (2012–2016)

  • Associate Professor of Pediatrics, University of Rochester Medical Center (2007–2012)

  • Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, University of Rochester Medical Center (2000–2006)

  • Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, Washington State University (1995–2000)

  • Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, Drake University (1993–1995)

  • Lecturer, Department of Psychology, University of California Los Angeles (1990–1993)

Major Honors and Awards

  • New York State Association for Behavior Analysis Award for Significant Contributions to Applied Behavior Analysis (2003)

  • Ruth A. Lawrence Academic Faculty Research Service Award, University of Rochester Medical Center (2009)

  • Endowed Chair:...

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References and Reading

  1. Arnold, L. E., Ober, N., Aman, M. G., Handen, B., Smith, T., Pan, X., … & Rice Jr, R. (2018). A 1.5-year follow-up of parent training and atomoxetine for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms and noncompliant/disruptive behavior in autism. Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology, 28, 322.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bearss, K., Johnson, C., Smith, T., Lecavalier, L., Swiezy, N., Aman, M., … & Scahill, L. (2015). Parent training for young children with autism spectrum disorder and disruptive behavior: A randomized clinical trial. JAMA, 313(15), 1524–1533.  https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.2015.3150.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Cohen, H., Amerine-Dickens, M., & Smith, T. (2006). Early intensive behavioral treatment: Replication of the UCLA model in a community setting. Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, 27, S145–S155.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Handen, B. L., Aman, M. G., Arnold, L. E., Hyman, S. L., Tumuluru, R., Lecavalier, L., … & Smith, T. (2015). Atomoxetine, parent training and their combination in children with autism spectrum and ADHD. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 54(11), 905–915.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2015.08.013.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Hyman, S. L., Stewart, P. A., Foley, J., Cain, U., Peck, R., Morris, D. D., & Smith, T. (2016). The gluten-free/casein-free diet: A double-blind challenge trial in children with autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 46(1), 205–220.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-015-2564-9.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Iadarola, S., Shih, W., Dean, M., Reisinger, E., Harwood, R., Hetherington, S., Mandell, D., Kasari, C., & Smith, T. (2018). Implementing a manualized, classroom transition intervention for students with ASD in under-resourced schools. Behavior Modification, 42(1), 126–147.  https://doi.org/10.1177/0145445517711437.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. McEachin, J. J., Smith, T., & Lovaas, O. I. (1993). Long-term outcome of children with autism who received early intensive behavioral treatment. American Journal on Mental Retardation, 97, 359–372.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. Mruzek, D. W., McAleavey, S., Engel, S., & Smith, T. (2016). Toilet training students with intellectual disability in a school setting with a novel enuresis alarm: An initial evaluation. Journal of Special Education Technology, 31(4), 217–227.  https://doi.org/10.1177/0162643416673915.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Smith, T., & Antolovich, M. (2000). Parental perceptions of supplemental interventions received by young children with autism in intensive behavior analytic treatment. Behavioral Interventions, 15, 83–97.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Smith, T., & Iadarola, S. (2015). Evidence update: Autism spectrum disorder. Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, 44(6), 897–922.  https://doi.org/10.1080/15374416.2015.1077448.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. Smith, T., Buch, G. A., & Gamby, T. (2000a). Parent-directed, intensive early intervention for children with pervasive developmental disorder. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 21, 297–309.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Smith, T., Groen, A., & Wynn, J. W. (2000b). Randomized trial of intensive early intervention for children with pervasive developmental disorder. American Journal on Mental Retardation, 104, 269–285.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Smith, T., Klorman, R., & Mruzek, D. W. (2015). Predicting outcome of community-based early intensive behavioral intervention for children with autism. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 43(7), 1271–1282. PMID: 25778537.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Smith, T., Aman, M. G., Arnold, L. E., Silverman, L. B., Lecavalier, L., Hollway, J., … & Handen, B. L. (2016a). Atomoxetine and parent training for children with autism and ADHD: 24-week extension study. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 55(10), 868–876.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2016.06.015.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Smith, T., Jordan, A., & Tiede, G. (2016b). Early intensive behavioral intervention: Current status of the UCLA model and future directions. Perspectives on Early Childhood Psychology and Education, 1(2), 7–28.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PediatricsUniversity of Rochester Medical CenterRochesterUSA