Cell Migration pp 159-173 | Cite as

Analysis of Cell Migration in Caenorhabditis elegans

  • M. Afaq Shakir
  • Erik A. Lundquist
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology™ book series (MIMB, volume 294)

Abstract

This chapter is concerned with a method of analysis and quantification of cell migration defects in mutants of the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans. The method takes advantage of transgenic expression of the green fluorescent protein to visualize migrating cells. By following these protocols, one will be able to analyze cell migration defects in new mutant strains for comparison to wild-type and to other mutants. Techniques described include obtaining wild-type and mutant worm strains as well as strains harboring green fluorescent protein transgenes; maintenance and manipulation of C. elegans in the laboratory; introducing transgenes into different genetic backgrounds; mounting worms for fluorescence microscopy; and scoring and analysis of cell migration defects.

Key Words

Cell migration C. elegans green fluorescent protein cell-specific promoter mutant analysis transgene 

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Afaq Shakir
    • 1
  • Erik A. Lundquist
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Molecular BiosciencesUniversity of KansasLawrence

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