Advertisement

Immunohistochemistry of Xenopus Embryos

  • Carl Robinson
  • Matt Guille
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology™ book series (MIMB, volume 127)

Abstract

Immunohistochemistry is a very powerful technique for determining both the tissue-specific and subcellular location of endogenous and exogenous proteins within an embryo. The technique is relatively simple and when used on its own or in conjunction with other immunological techniques, such as Western blotting, immunoblocking, and supershift assays (see  Chapter 15), can provide a large amount of information about the potential function or regulation of a given protein in a relatively small amount of time.

Keywords

Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Xenopus Embryo Embryo Extract Secondary Antibody Conjugate Excess Antibody 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. 1.
    Catty, D., ed. (1988) Antibodies: A Practical Approach, IRL Press at Oxford University Press Oxford, Vol. I.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Catty, D., ed. (1988) Antibodies: A Practical Approach, IRL Press at Oxford University Press Oxford, Vol. II.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Harlow, E. and Lane, D. P. (1988) Antibodies: A Laboratory Manual, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories, Cold Spring Harbor, NY.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Maniatis, T., Fritsch, E., and Sambrook, J. (1982) Molecular Cloning: A Laboratory Manual, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratories, Cold Spring Harbor, NY.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Harland, R. M. (1991) In situ hybridisation: an improved wholemount method for Xenopus embryos. Methods Cell Biol. 36, 685–695.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Gove, C, Walmsey, M., Njjar, S., Bertwistle, D., Guille, M., Partington, G., et al. (1997) Over-expression of GATA-6 in Xenopus embryos blocks differential heart precursors. EMBO J. 16, 355–368.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Wyllie, A. H., Laskey, R. A., Finch, J., and Gurdon, J. B. (1978) Selective DNA conservation and chromatin assembly after injection of SV40 DNA into Xenopus oocytes. Dev. Biol. 64, 178–188.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carl Robinson
    • 1
  • Matt Guille
    • 1
  1. 1.Biophysics Laboratories, Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical SciencesUniversity of PortsmouthPortsmouthUK

Personalised recommendations