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Chiral Separations by Capillary Electrophoresis Using Cinchona Alkaloid Derivatives as Chiral Counter-Ions

  • Michael Lämmerhofer
  • Wolfgang Lindner
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 243)

Abstract

Cinchona alkaloids and derivatives thereof, obtained by dedicated structural modifications, have a long tradition in various stereochemical methods. Among them, their stereoselective ion-pairing capabilities for acidic compounds have been exploited for capillary electrophoretic enantiomer separations of chiral acids (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14).

Keywords

Chiral Selector Octanoic Acid Cinchona Alkaloid Filling Technique Plug Length 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc.,Totowa, NJ 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Lämmerhofer
    • 1
  • Wolfgang Lindner
    • 1
  1. 1.Christian Doppler Laboratory for Molecular Recognition Materials, Institute of Analytical ChemistryUniversity of ViennaViennaAustria

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