Evaluation of Cytokines in Migraine Patients by ELISA

  • Irene Munno
  • Mariarosaria Marinaro
  • Giuseppe Lacedra
  • Antonia Bassi
  • Vincenzo Centonze
Part of the Methods in Molecular Medicine™ book series (MIMM, volume 60)

Abstract

The history of laboratory testing closely follows developments in the field of immunology in general. Serologic investigations were a natural outgrowth of the study of immunity, and the period from 1900 to 1950 has been called the era of international serology (1). Serology is the study of the noncellular components in the blood. At this time, attention turned to research on the production and use of serum to control disease, and several scientific institutes were created for this purpose. Many of the tests performed in today′s clinical laboratory fall into the category of serologic tests. The need to develop rapid, specific and sensitive assays to determine the presence of important biologically active molecules ushered in a new era of testing in the clinical laboratory.

Keywords

Titration Migraine Immobilization Sulfuric Acid Polystyrene 

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Irene Munno
    • 1
  • Mariarosaria Marinaro
    • 2
  • Giuseppe Lacedra
    • 1
  • Antonia Bassi
    • 3
  • Vincenzo Centonze
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Internal Medicine, Immunology and Infectious DiseasesUniversity of BariBariItaly
  2. 2.Departments of Surgery and PathologyUniversity of FoggiaItaly
  3. 3.Headache-Unit Internal Medicine, DIMIMPUniversity of BariBariItaly

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