Renal Cancer pp 255-264 | Cite as

Murine Animal Model

  • Nobuyasu Nishisaka
  • Philo Morse
  • Richard F. Jones
  • Ching Y. Wang
  • Gabriel P. Haas
Part of the Methods in Molecular Medicine™ book series (MIMM, volume 53)

Abstract

Experimental animal models are available for the development of new treatment. Murine animal models have particular advantages for comparative study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of different treatment modalities because many mice can be treated at the same time with easy handling. Among several experimental models, murine renal carcinoma (Renca), which arises spontaneously in Balb/c mice, is the most frequently used for the assessment of chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and radiotherapy. Renca cells readily establish tumors in isogenic mice, producing histologically proven adenocarcinoma with a predictable growth rate to mimic the clinical situation for orthotopic growth and metastasis in a reasonable time frame. Because of its poor immunogenicity and its responsiveness to immunotherapy, the number of studies using cytokine gene-modified tumor vaccines—such as interferon-alpha or interleukin-2—in the Renca system is growing. Therefore, Renca experiments greatly contribute to the analysis of the mechanisms of antitumor immune response. In this chapter, we describe several experimental systems using this Renca model.

Keywords

Formaldehyde EDTA Hydroxide Adenocarcinoma Penicillin 

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nobuyasu Nishisaka
    • 1
  • Philo Morse
    • 1
  • Richard F. Jones
    • 1
  • Ching Y. Wang
    • 1
  • Gabriel P. Haas
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of UrologyState University of New York Health Science Center at Syracuse and VA Medical CenterSyracuseUSA

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