Campylobacter

  • Anavella Gaitán Herrera
Part of the Methods in Biotechnology book series (MIBT, volume 14)

Abstract

The association of infection with consumption of contaminated water and foods, particularly poultry, is clearly established (1). Campylobacter food poisoning outbreaks occur either sporadically, affecting individuals and small groups suchs as families, or larger community outbreaks. Campylobacter jejuni commonly occurs in undercooked chicken (2). Cross-contamination from raw poultry to foods that are not cooked before eating is also a cause. Campylobacter spp. are readily destroyed by temperatures used in Pasteurization and cooking (3,4). They may survive for several weeks in a moist environment but quickly die in dry conditions, particularly at room temperature. Acidic conditions rapidly destroy them and they show no unusual resistance to disinfectants. Table 1 presents characteristicsof catalase-positive Campylobacters.
Table 1

Characteristics of Catalase-Positive Campylobacters

  

Catalase-positiveCampylobacter

  

C. jejuni

C. coli

C. fetus

C. fetus ss. venerealis

 

Oxidase

+

+

+

+

 

Ferment sugars

-

-

-

-

 

NO3 reduction

+

+

+

+

 

NO2 reduction

-

-

-

-

 

H2S (SIM)

-

-

-

-

 

H2s (Strip)

+

+

+

(V)

 

Hippurate hydrolysis

+

-

-

-

 

1% glycine

+

+

+

-

T

3.5% NaCl

-

-

-

-

O

25°C

-

-

+

+

L

30.5°C

-(Vr)

+

+

+

E

37°C

+

+

+

+

R

42°C

+

+

-(V)

-(V)

A

Aerobic (plate)

-

-

-

-

N

5% O2 (plate)

+

+

+

+

C

Nalidixic acida

S

S

R

R

E

Cephalotinb

R

R

S

S

 

Falta TTCc

S(V)

R(V)

S

S

Vr= results are variable;+ = positive; = negative; S = sensible; R = resistant.

aHigh concentration nalidixic acid sensitivity disc (30μg). Any zone of inhibition on agar plates is regarded as a positive or a sensitive strain.

bHigh concentration cephalothin sensitivity disc (30μg).

cTTC = 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride. More than 6 mm zone of inhibition is regarded as a positive or sensitive strain.

Keywords

Dioxide Hydrated Mercury Agar Lactate 

References

  1. 1.
    Bryan F. L. and Doyle M. P. (1995) Health risks and consequences of Salmonella and Campylobacter jejuni in raw poultry. J. Food Protein 58, 326–344.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Griffiths P. L. and Park R. W. A. (1990) Campylobacters associated with human diarrhoeal disease. J. Appl. Bact. 69, 281–301.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Jones R. G. and Skinner F. A. (1992) Identification Methods in Applied and Environmental Microbiology. Society for Applied Bacteriology Technical Series No. 29, Board, Blackwell Scientific Publishers, Oxford, UK.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Vandrzant C. and Splittstoesser D. F. (1990) Compendium of Methods for the Microbiological Examination of Foods, 3rd ed., American Public Health Association, Washington, DC.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Unipath Ltd. (1990) The Oxoid Manual, 6th ed., Basingstoke, UK.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anavella Gaitán Herrera
    • 1
  1. 1.Pontificia Universidad JaverianaBogotáColombia

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