Ilarvirus Isolation and RNA Extraction

  • Deyin Guo
  • Edgar Maiss
  • Günter Adam
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology™ book series (MIMB, volume 81)

Abstract

The genus Ilarvirus belongs to the family Bromoviridae, together with three other genera Bromovirus, Cucumovirus, and Alfamovirus (1). The ilarvirus genus includes at present 15 approved species and is divided into 10 subgroups according to serological relationships (2). The members are listed in Table 1.
Table 1

Species in the Genus Ilarvirus

Species (acronym)

Subgroup

Taxonomic status

American plum line pattern (APLPV)

5

Approved

Apple mosaic (ApMV)

3

Approved

Asparagus virus 2 (AV-2)

2

Approved

Citrus leaf rugose (CiLRV)

2

Approved

Citrus variegation (CVV)

2

Approved

Elm mottel (EMoV)

2

Approved

Humulus japonicus (HJV)

9

Approved

Hydrangea mosaic (HdMV)

8

Approved

Lilac ring mottle (LRMV)

7

Approved

Parietaria mottle (PMoV)

10

Approved

Prune dwarf (PDV)

4

Approved

Prunus necrotic ringspot (PNRSV)

3

Approved

Spinach latent (SpLV)

6

Approved

Tobacco streak (TSV)

1

Type member

Tulare apple mosaic (TAMV)

2

Approved

The list contains the species according to ref. 1.

Keywords

Vortex Sucrose Phenol Chloroform Aldehyde 

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Deyin Guo
    • 1
  • Edgar Maiss
    • 1
  • Günter Adam
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für Angewandte BotanikUniversität HamburgGermany

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