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Lyophilization of Proteins

  • Ciarán Ó. Fágáin
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology™ book series (MIMB, volume 59)

Abstract

Lyophilization, or freeze-drying, is a method for the preservation of labile materials in a dehydrated form. It can be particularly suitable for high-value biomolecules, such as proteins. The process involves the removal of bulk water from a frozen protein solution by sublimation under vacuum with gentle heating (primary drying). This is followed by controlled heating to more elevated temperatures for removal of the remaining “bound” water from the protein preparation (secondary drying). Residual moisture levels are often <1% (1). If the freeze-drying operation is carried out correctly (see Section 3.), the protein will preserve all or most of its initial biological activity in the dry state. This dry state offers many advantages for long-term storage of the protein in question.

Keywords

Glass Transition Temperature Bulk Water Sublimation Rate Shelf Temperature Drain Outlet 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ciarán Ó. Fágáin
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Biological SciencesDublin City UniversityDublinIreland

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