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Establishing Relationships Between Closely Related Species Using Total Genomic DNA as a Probe

  • Kesara Anamthawat-Jónsson
  • J. S. Pat Heslop-Harrison
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology™ book series (MIMB, volume 50)

Abstract

Questions regarding species identification, differentiation, and relationships often emerge in biological investigations. One may need to examine the extent of genetic relationships between closely related species for the purposes of resource management or assessment of biodiversity. It may also be important to verify the identity of commercial clones and cultivars used in agriculture and forestry, to detect pathological diseases, or to evaluate evolutionary changes at the molecular and organismic levels. Since interspecific and intergeneric hybridization forms an important part of evolution in many plant species, it is often necessary to determine the ancestors of polyploids, or the origin of alien chromosomes or chromosome segments in natural and cultivated hybrid derivatives.

Keywords

Chromosome Segment Chromosome Preparation Nick Translation Alien Chromosome Cereal Group 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kesara Anamthawat-Jónsson
    • 1
  • J. S. Pat Heslop-Harrison
    • 2
  1. 1.Agricultural Research InstituteKeldnaholtReykjavikIceland
  2. 2.Karyobiology Group, Department of Cell BiologyJohn Innes CentreNorwichUK

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