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An Improved Method for the Synthesis and Deprotection of Methylphosphonate Oligonucleotides

  • Richard I. Hogrefe
  • Mark A. Reynolds
  • Morteza M. Vaghefi
  • Kevin M. Young
  • Timothy A. Riley
  • Robert E. Klem
  • Lyle J. ArnoldJr
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 20)

Abstract

The value of oligonucleotides as therapeutic agents has become increasingly apparent over the past decade (1, 2, 3). In order to be useful as therapeutic agents, oligonucleotides must possess a number of properties. These include:
  1. 1.

    Resistance to enzyme degradation;

     
  2. 2.

    The ability to enter target cells;

     
  3. 3.

    A lack of interference with normal DNA and RNA processing enzymes; and

     
  4. 4.

    The ability to bind to a target and alter its expression in a sequence-specific manner.

     

Keywords

Ammonium Hydroxide Coupling Efficiency Backbone Cleavage Anhydrous Acetonitrile Anhydrous Pyridine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard I. Hogrefe
    • 1
  • Mark A. Reynolds
    • 1
  • Morteza M. Vaghefi
    • 1
  • Kevin M. Young
    • 1
  • Timothy A. Riley
    • 1
  • Robert E. Klem
    • 1
  • Lyle J. ArnoldJr
    • 1
  1. 1.Genta, Inc.San Diego

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