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Expression of Foreign Genes in Mammalian Cells Using an Antibody Fusion System

  • Simon J. Forster
  • Francis J. Carr
  • William J. Harris
  • Anita A. Hamilton
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 10)

Abstract

Whereas the expression of foreign genes in mammalian cells usually proves successful, the purification of gene products is often a difficult and time-consuming process. The availability of monoclonal antibodies to the foreign protein can greatly assist in small scale purification, but where antibodies are not available, alternatives have to be sought One useful approach involves the fusion of the foreign gene adjacent to a gene segment encoding an antibody heavy chain variable region (1). By transfection of this construct into a cell line producing a compatible light chain or by cotransfection of the fusion product with a light chain gene, an antibody-like molecule can be produced and purified using the corresponding antigen.

Keywords

Foreign Gene Fusion Product Fume Hood Light Chain Gene Calf Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Humana Press, Inc., Totowa, NJ 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Simon J. Forster
    • 1
  • Francis J. Carr
    • 1
  • William J. Harris
    • 1
  • Anita A. Hamilton
    • 1
  1. 1.Scotgen LimitedUniversity of AberdeenAberdeenScotland

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