Grafting In Vitro

  • Michael Parkinson
  • Carmel M. O’Neill
  • Philip J. Dix
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology™ book series (MIMB, volume 6)

Abstract

Graft formation in plants involves the severing of the vascular system with consequent loss of water and solute transport throughout the plant. This transport must be restored to prevent death resulting from nutrient starvation or dessication.

Keywords

Sucrose Agar Hydroxide Rubber Germinate 

References

  1. 1.
    Stoddard, F. L. and McCully, M. E. (1979) Histology of the development of the graft union in Pea roots, Can. J. Bat. 57(14),1486–1501.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Yeoman, M. M., Kilpatrick, D. C., Miedzybrodzka, M. B. W., and Gould A. R. (1978) Cellular interactions during graft formation in plants, a recognition phenomenon? S. E. B. Symp. 32,139–160.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Lindsay, D. W., Yeoman, M. M., and Brown, R. (1974) An analysis of the development of the graft union in Lycopersicon esculentum. Annals of Botany 38,639–646.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Parkinson, M. and Yeoman, M. M. (1982) Graft formation in cultured, explanted internodes. New Phytol. 91,711–719.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Parkinson
    • 1
  • Carmel M. O’Neill
    • 1
  • Philip J. Dix
    • 1
  1. 1.St. Patrick’s CollegeKildareRepublic of Ireland

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