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Laser-Assisted Microdissection in Proteomic Analyses

  • Darrell L. Ellsworth
  • Stephen Russell
  • Brenda Deyarmin
  • Anthony G. Sullivan
  • Henry Brzeski
  • Richard I. Somiari
  • Craig D. Shriver
Protocol
Part of the Springer Protocols Handbooks book series (SPH)

Abstract

Current research on the molecular basis of human reproductive cancers involves mapping cellular pathways and identifying molecular alterations associated with disease onset and progression. The ability to characterize changes in protein expression that occur during the transition from normal to benign disease to invasive cancer requires homogeneous populations of cells free from contamination by other cell types. With advances in proteomic technologies, proteins can now be quantified in a relatively small number of target cells obtained from a limited amount of tissue. The increased demand for selective isolation of pure cell populations from small quantities of tissue calls for refined protocols for tissue preparation and efficient methods of tissue microdissection that preserve protein integrity.

Keywords

Equilibration Buffer Laser Microdissection Unlabeled Sample Rehydration Buffer Magnesium Acetate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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    Ellsworth, D. L., Shriver, C. D., Ellsworth, R. E., Deyarmin, B., and Somiari, R. I. (2003) Laser capture microdissection of paraffin-embedded tissues. BioTechniques 34, 42–46.PubMedGoogle Scholar
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    Berggren, K., Chernokalskaya, E., Steinberg, T. H., et al. (2000) Background-free, high sensitivity staining of proteins in one-and two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels using a luminescent ruthenium complex. Electrophoresis 21, 2509–2521.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Darrell L. Ellsworth
    • 1
  • Stephen Russell
    • 2
  • Brenda Deyarmin
    • 3
  • Anthony G. Sullivan
    • 2
    • 3
  • Henry Brzeski
    • 4
  • Richard I. Somiari
    • 5
  • Craig D. Shriver
    • 6
  1. 1.Cardiovascular Disease Research Program and Clinical Breast Care Project, Windber Research InstituteWindber
  2. 2.Functional Genomics and Protemics Unit, Windber Research InstituteWindber
  3. 3.Thermoelectron Training InstituteWest Palm Beach
  4. 4.Functional Genomics and Proteomics Unit, Windber Research InstituteWindber
  5. 5.Functional Genomics and Protemics Unit, ITSI-BiosciencesJohnstown
  6. 6.Clinical Breast Care Project, Walter Reed Army Medical CenterWashington,DC

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