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S1 Mapping Using Single-Stranded DNA Probes

  • Stéphane Viville
  • Roberto Mantovani
Protocol
  • 327 Downloads
Part of the Springer Protocols Handbooks book series (SPH)

Abstract

The S1 nuclease is an endonuclease isolated from Aspergillus oryzae that digests single- but not double-stranded nucleic acid. In addition, it digests partially mismatched double-stranded molecules with such sensitivity that even a single base-pair mismatch can be cut and hence detected. In practice, a probe of end-labeled double-stranded DNA is denatured and hybridized to complementary RNA molecules. S1 is used to recognize and cut mismatches or unannealed regions and the products are analyzed on a denaturing polyacrylamide gel. A number of different uses of the S1 nuclease have been developed to analyze mRNA taking advantage of this property (1,2). Both qualitative and quantitative information can be obtained in the same experiment (3).

Keywords

Aspergillus Oryzae Kinase Buffer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stéphane Viville
    • 1
  • Roberto Mantovani
    • 2
  1. 1.Institut de Genetique et de Biologie Moleculaire et CellulaireCNRS/INSERM/ULPStrasbourgFrance
  2. 2.Departimento de Genetica e di Biologia dei MicrorganismiUniversita de MilanoMilanItaly

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