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Slice Patch Clamp

  • Tadashi Isa
  • Keiji Imoto
  • Yasuo Kawaguchi
Part of the Springer Protocols Handbooks book series (SPH)

Abstract

Since late 1980s, the whole-cell patch-clamp technique has been used as a powerful tool for analyzing local circuits of the central nervous system in a brain slice preparation in which the fundamental architecture of local circuits is mostly maintained. When combined with intracellular staining techniques, the technique allows high-resolution analysis of the membrane and the synaptic and morphological properties of the recorded cells. We offer a brief introduction to slice patch-clamp recording, including acute slice preparation, selection of intracellular and extracellular solutions, techniques for forming giga-ohm seals and whole-cell recordings, and staining of the recorded neurons. Much effort has gone into describing a number of small but important technical issues that can be useful for beginners attempting this technique.

Keywords

Brain Slice Pipette Solution Choline Chloride Synaptic Current Electrode Solution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. 1.
    Neher E, Sakmann B (1976) Single-channel currents recorded from membrane of denervated frog muscle fibres. Nature 260:799–802PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Hamill OP, Marty A, Neher E, Sakmann B, Sigworth FJ (1981) Improved patch-clamp techniques for high-resolution current recording from cells and cell-free membrane patches. Pflugers Arch 391:85–100PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Edwards FA, Konnerth A, Sakmann B, Takahashi T (1989) A thin slice preparation for patch clamp recordings from neurones of the mammalian central nervous system. Pflugers Arch 414:600–612PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Developmental PhysiologyNational Institute for Physiological Sciences, National Institutes of Natural SciencesOkazakiJapan
  2. 2.Department of Information PhysiologyNational Institute for Physiological Sciences, National Institutes of Natural SciencesOkazakiJapan
  3. 3.Department of Cerebral ResearchNational Institute for Physiological Sciences, National Institutes of Natural SciencesOkazakiJapan

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