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Methods for Sperm Concentration Determination

  • Lars Björndahl
Protocol
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 927)

Abstract

Proper assessment of the number of spermatozoa is essential not only as an initial step in every clinical infertility investigation [Björndahl et al (2010) A practical guide to basic laboratory andrology, 1st edn. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge] but also when attempting to establish the total sperm production in the testis [Amann (Hum Reprod 25:22–28, 2010); Amann (J Androl 30:626–641, 2009); Amann and Chapman (J Androl 30:642–649, 2009)]. Reliable methods combined with an understanding of the specific physiology involved as well as the main sources of errors related to the assessment of sperm concentration are critical for ensuring accurate concentration determination [Björndahl et al (2010) A practical guide to basic laboratory andrology, 1st edn. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge; World Health Organization (2010) WHO laboratory manual for the examination and processing of human semen. WHO, Geneva]. This chapter therefore focuses on these three aspects.

Key words

Sperm Concentration Count 

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Andrology Laboratory, Centre for Andrology and Sexual Medicine, Clinic for Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, HuddingeKarolinska University Hospital and Karolinska InstitutetStockholmSweden

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