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Dissection of Rodent Brain Regions

  • Sabine SpijkerEmail author
Protocol
Part of the Neuromethods book series (NM, volume 57)

Abstract

Dissection of brain tissue is an important step in sample preparation for (subcellular) proteomics studies. In this chapter, brain removal and separate dissection of multiple brain regions from a single brain are described in step-by-step protocol. This concerns dissection from fresh or frozen tissue of cerebellum, hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, and striatum.

Key words

Dissection Mouse Brain Hippocampus Cerebellum Cortex 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology, Center for Neurogenomics and Cognitive ResearchVU UniversityAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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