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Confocal Microscopy on the Internet

  • Kristin L. Hazelwood
  • Christopher S. Murphy
  • Zachary C. Cunningham
  • Matthew J. Parry-Hill
  • Richard L. Ludlow
  • Ericka B. Ramko
  • Anna P. Ozarowska
  • Adam M. Rainey
  • Michael W. Davidson
Protocol
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 1075)

Abstract

In a few short years, the Internet (in terms of the World Wide Web) has become a powerful informational resource for the original scientific literature pertaining to biological investigations using the laser scanning confocal microscope. However, there still remains an obvious void in the development of educational Web sites targeted at beginning students and novices in the field. Furthermore, many of the commercial aftermarket manufacturers (for example, those offering live-cell imaging chambers) have Web sites that are not adequately represented in published compilations, and are therefore somewhat difficult to locate. In order to address this issue, several educational sites dedicated to optical microscopy and digital imaging that are being constructed and hosted at The Florida State University are currently turning their attention to the increasing application of confocal microscopy in the biological and materials sciences. The primary focus of this effort is to create new sections on the existing sites that address the important educational issues in confocal microscopy, as well as creating indices of links to both the confocal scientific literature and the Web sites of manufacturers who supply useful accessories.

Key words

Confocal microscopy Internet Web HTML Java Flash Interactive tutorials Digital video Image processing Streaming media 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported in part by contracts with Nikon USA, Inc., Olympus America Inc., and Olympus Corporation (Tokyo), who also supplied instrumentation, and with funds generated by licensing images through The Florida State University Research Foundation. Web site construction and imaging were conducted at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, supported by Cooperative Agreement (DMR-0084173) and the State of Florida. The authors wish to also thank their many industrial partners who have supplied equipment and expertise: Nikon USA (Anna Scordato, Stanley Schwartz, Stephen Ross, Joseph LoBiondo, Eric Flem, Chris Brandmaier, and Deborah O. Robbins), Olympus America (Ian Kirk, Monica Mahler, Brad Burklow, Kimberly Wicklund, William K. Fester, George E. Steares, Nicolas George, Christopher Higgins, Kenji Matsuba, Esther Ahrent, Rainer Wegerhoff, John Crenshaw, and Mortimer Abramowitz), QImaging (John Bogan and David Barnes), Omega Optical, Inc. (Dan Osborne), Hunt Optics and Imaging (John Marchlenski and Andrew Hunt), Hamamatsu Photonics, Inc. (Butch Moomaw), Semrock, Inc. (Turan Erdogan), Invitrogen Molecular Probes (Michael O’Grady and Iain Johnson), and Covance, Inc. (Poonam Kaul).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kristin L. Hazelwood
    • 1
  • Christopher S. Murphy
    • 1
  • Zachary C. Cunningham
    • 1
  • Matthew J. Parry-Hill
    • 1
  • Richard L. Ludlow
    • 1
  • Ericka B. Ramko
    • 1
  • Anna P. Ozarowska
    • 1
  • Adam M. Rainey
    • 1
  • Michael W. Davidson
    • 1
  1. 1.National High Magnetic Field Laboratory and Department of Biological ScienceThe Florida State UniversityTallahasseeUSA

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