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Grafting of Somites

  • D. Stern Claudio
Part of the METHODS IN MOLECULAR BIOLOGY™ book series (MIMB, volume 461)

1. Introduction

The somites are an intriguing invention of vertebrate embryos. They represent the most overtly segmented structures of the body plan, but they give rise to both obviously segmental (e.g., the axial skeleton) as well as not-so-obviously metameric (dermis and skeletal muscle) elements. In addition, they play a key role in controlling several aspects of the organization of the central and peripheral nervous system of the trunk and participate in several different types of inductive interactions, both within themselves and with neighboring tissues, like the neural tube, the notochord, the metanephric and lateral plate meso-derm, and the ectoderm and endoderm (see [1, 2] for reviews).

Questions that can be addressed by manipulating somites range from investigations on the mechanisms by which metameric pattern is established, to their influence on the segmental outgrowth and differentiation of precursors of the peripheral nervous system (neural crest cells, motor axon growth...

Keywords

Primitive Streak Fine Forceps Vitelline Membrane Silicon Grease Paraxial Mesoderm 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Stern Claudio
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Anatomy and Developmental BiologyUniversity CollegeLondon

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