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The Mouse as a Developmental Model

  • Paul T. Sharpe
Part of the METHODS IN MOLECULAR BIOLOGY™ book series (MIMB, volume 461)

The laboratory mouse, Mus musculus, is the developmental biologist's mammal of choice for studies of development. Its embryology and genetics have been extensively studied for over 100 years. However, the advent of in vivo gene manipulation in the last few years has established the mouse as probably the single most powerful animal system in vertebrate biology.

Mouse developmental biology, as it exists today, has its origins in genetics and embryology. These days it is hard to separate mouse development from mouse genetics, the two having become intertwined as genetics provides increasingly more powerful tools for studying development.

The laboratory mouse, Mus musculus, is the developmental biologist's mammal of choice for studies of development. Its embryology and genetics have been extensively studied for over 100 years. However, the advent of in vivogene manipulation in the last few years has established the mouse as probably the single most powerful animal system in vertebrate...

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul T. Sharpe
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Craniofacial DevelopmentKing's College LondonLondonUK

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