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Microarrays pp 363-373 | Cite as

Forward-Phase and Reverse-Phase Protein Microarray

  • Yaping Zong
  • Shanshan Zhang
  • Huang-Tsu Chen
  • Yunfei Zong
  • Yaxian Shi
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology™ book series (MIMB, volume 381)

Abstract

Protein microarray is a powerful tool for identifying disease biomarkers and therapeutical targets, and for systematically studying biological pathways with high efficiency. Although the protein microarray platform has been adopted by proteomic research and discovery, what remains problematic is how to maintain the activities and structures of printed proteins on slide surface. With the recent accomplishments in the R & D laboratory, now scientists around the world are able to preserve the biological functions of spotted proteins for high throughput analysis. Full Moon BioSystems (FMB) has developed general guidelines, which helps scientists efficiently prepare forward as well as reverse-phase protein microarray using FMB’s proprietary polymer-coated slides, to obtain reliable and accurate array data with FMB’s unique detection and analysis technology.

Key Words

Calibration slide capture antibody cell lysates forward-phase protein arrays protein slides reserve-phase protein arrays signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) 

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Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yaping Zong
    • 1
  • Shanshan Zhang
    • 1
  • Huang-Tsu Chen
    • 1
  • Yunfei Zong
    • 1
  • Yaxian Shi
    • 1
  1. 1.Full Moon BioSystems, Inc.Sunnyvale

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