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Lanthionine and Other Relevant Sulfur Amino Acid Metabolites: Detection of Prospective Uremic Toxins in Serum by Multiple Reaction Monitoring Tandem Mass Spectrometry

  • Alessandra F. PernaEmail author
  • Francesca Pane
  • Nunzio Sepe
  • Carolina Fontanarosa
  • Gabriella Pinto
  • Miriam Zacchia
  • Francesco Trepiccione
  • Evgeniya Anishchenko
  • Diego Ingrosso
  • Piero Pucci
  • Angela Amoresano
Protocol
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 2007)

Abstract

In the context of the vascular effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), it is known that this gaseous endogenous biological modulator of inflammation, oxidative stress, etc. is a potent vasodilator. Chronic renal failure, a common disease affecting the aging population, is characterized by low levels of H2S in plasma and tissues, which could mediate their typical hypertensive pattern, along with other abnormalities. Lanthionine and homolanthionine, natural non-proteinogenic amino acids, are formed as side products of H2S production. Also in consideration of the intrinsic difficulties in H2S measuring, these compounds have been proposed as reliable and stable markers of H2S synthesis. However, in the setting of chronic renal failure patients on hemodialysis, they represent typical retention products (without ruling out the possibility of an increased intestinal synthesis) and prospective novel uremic toxins. Here, a method utilizing liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in multiple reaction monitoring ion mode has been developed and evaluated for the determination of these key H2S metabolites in plasma, by using a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer.

Key words

Mass spectrometry Multiple reaction monitoring Targeted analysis Metabolomics Homocysteine Homoserine Lanthionine Cystathionine 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alessandra F. Perna
    • 1
    Email author
  • Francesca Pane
    • 2
  • Nunzio Sepe
    • 2
  • Carolina Fontanarosa
    • 2
  • Gabriella Pinto
    • 2
  • Miriam Zacchia
    • 1
  • Francesco Trepiccione
    • 1
  • Evgeniya Anishchenko
    • 1
  • Diego Ingrosso
    • 3
  • Piero Pucci
    • 2
  • Angela Amoresano
    • 2
  1. 1.First Division of Nephrology, Department of Translational Medical Sciences, School of MedicineUniversity of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”NaplesItaly
  2. 2.Department of Chemical SciencesUniversity of Naples “Federico II”NaplesItaly
  3. 3.Department of Precision Medicine, School of MedicineUniversity of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”NaplesItaly

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