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Erythropoiesis pp 237-243 | Cite as

Chromosome Conformation Capture (3C and Higher) with Erythroid Samples

  • Ivan Krivega
  • Ann Dean
Protocol
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 1698)

Abstract

Chromosome conformation capture (3C) allows for the determination of the proximity in nuclei of DNA sequences that are linearly distant from one another in the genome. Proximity that is above that expected from random interaction provides evidence for potential long-range functional interactions such as between enhancers and their target genes. Many controls are required to convincingly demonstrate increased frequency of interaction between sequences and stringent functional tests must also be applied. Here, we present methodology suitable for 3C experiments that can also be applied as the basis for related 4C, 5C, and Hi-C approaches. These procedures are widely applicable to erythroid cell lines, progenitor cells, and tissues.

Key words

Chromosome conformation capture 3C Chromatin Enhancer Long-range interactions Gene regulation 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the Intramural Program of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health (DK015508 to AD).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media LLC 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Laboratory of Cellular and Developmental BiologyNational Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA

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