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FISH-in-CHIPS: A Microfluidic Platform for Molecular Typing of Cancer Cells

  • Karla Perez-Toralla
  • Guillaume Mottet
  • Ezgi Tulukcuoglu-Guneri
  • Jérôme Champ
  • François-Clément Bidard
  • Jean-Yves Pierga
  • Jerzy Klijanienko
  • Irena Draskovic
  • Laurent Malaquin
  • Jean-Louis Viovy
  • Stéphanie DescroixEmail author
Protocol
Part of the Methods in Molecular Biology book series (MIMB, volume 1547)

Abstract

Microfluidics offer powerful tools for the control, manipulation, and analysis of cells, in particular for the assessment of cell malignancy or the study of cell subpopulations. However, implementing complex biological protocols on chip remains a challenge. Sample preparation is often performed off chip using multiple manually performed steps, and protocols usually include different dehydration and drying steps that are not always compatible with a microfluidic format.

Here, we report the implementation of a Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) protocol for the molecular typing of cancer cells in a simple and low-cost device. The geometry of the chip allows integrating the sample preparation steps to efficiently assess the genomic content of individual cells using a minute amount of sample. The FISH protocol can be fully automated, thus enabling its use in routine clinical practice.

Key words

FISH Gene amplification Microfluidic Cancer Sample preparation 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by EU funding (FP7 Diatools European Projects and CellO ERC advanced grant).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media LLC 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Karla Perez-Toralla
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Guillaume Mottet
    • 1
  • Ezgi Tulukcuoglu-Guneri
    • 1
  • Jérôme Champ
    • 1
    • 8
    • 9
  • François-Clément Bidard
    • 4
  • Jean-Yves Pierga
    • 4
    • 5
  • Jerzy Klijanienko
    • 6
  • Irena Draskovic
    • 7
  • Laurent Malaquin
    • 1
  • Jean-Louis Viovy
    • 1
  • Stéphanie Descroix
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Macromolecules and Microsystems in Biology and MedicineInstitut Curie, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, PSL Research UniversityParisFrance
  2. 2.Univ Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris CitéParisFrance
  3. 3.Université Paris Sorbonne Cité, INSERM UMR-S1147, Centre Universitaire des Saints-PèresParisFrance
  4. 4.Department of Medical OncologyInstitut CurieParisFrance
  5. 5.Université Paris DescartesParisFrance
  6. 6.Department of PathologyInstitut CurieParisFrance
  7. 7.Telomeres & Cancer laboratoryInstitut Curie, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, EquipeLabellisé « Ligue »ParisFrance
  8. 8.University Paris-Diderot, PRES Paris Cité, INSERM/CNRS UMR944/7212ParisFrance
  9. 9.Molecular Oncology UnitAPHP, Saint-Louis HospitalParisFrance

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